Election Day Approaches!

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From AAI Program Director Linda M. Jackson:

This is the month to get ready to vote! There are numberless reasons to do so, beginning with the need to have leaders who will protect the planet’s natural resources that give us life. We also know that last year’s tax cuts will mean budget cuts next year, very likely in fields that are critical in our work of supporting older adults.

What’s at stake is the long-term viability of social security and Medicare, access to health care and affordable prescription drugs, security of pensions, and help for caregivers. We need elected officials who are willing to ask questions, seek solutions, and work together to find the path forward.

Beyond determining budgets and policy, our government officials set the tone for public discourse. September’s events caused many of us to stop in our tracks. Many women, including myself, had the unwanted reminder of moments when we were alone, startled, and attacked. While older women are particularly bolstered by the voices of younger women in the #metoo movement, they may not have access to tools to help them process trauma. Think of Marin’s older women living alone, haunted by these resurrected memories. Often, resources for victims are geared toward younger women, and may use images or language that alienate older clients.

Luckily, you in your work are in a place to help older women understand that assault — whether it took place last month or 50 years ago — was not their fault. How can we help? By being present and listening. Telling a story is healing. If a person wants to talk with a professional, they can call the RAINN sexual assault hotline at 800.656.HOPE (4673). The National Clearinghouse on Abuse in Later Life also has resources for victims, professionals, and advocates.

The Aging Action Initiative speaks up to ensure that all the people we work with have the support needed for a healthy, safe, and engaging quality of life. I witnessed the power of showing up and speaking up in the realm of housing just this last month. After a roomful of speakers asked the San Rafael City Council to deny an appeal of their Planning Commission’s approval of assisted living, the councilmembers voted unanimously for the new housing. And after receiving a stack of letters and hearing from half a dozen speakers, the Ross Valley Sanitary District unanimously approved a fee reduction for the affordable senior rental housing Victory Village in Fairfax.

You have a voice. Mail in your ballot or go to the polls on November 6. Call your family and friends in other states and wish them a successful vote day. Vote as if the health of your next year depends on it.

Looking for information on the propositions and elections?

  • The California Alliance for Retired Americans recommends voting yes on Proposition 1 and Proposition  2 for affordable housing.
  • The League of Women Voters is a resource about the process of voting and the propositions and candidates. The Marin LWV recommends voting yes on Measure AA for local transportation funding.

Double check that you’re registered in Marin by visiting www.marincounty.org/depts/rv/voter-registration/register/am-i-registered or calling (415) 499-6456 before October 22.

~Linda

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Ten things I learned at the Aging in America Conference

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From Program Director Linda Jackson:

Our network was in luck this year: the Aging in America Conference, hosted by the American Society on Aging (ASA), came to San Francisco at the end of March. This full immersion into the world of learning about and advocacy for older people across the United States met all expectations. General sessions covered tantalizing topics such as technology reinventing aging, community-based organizations (CBOs) at the forefront for health interventions, ending senior poverty, and innovations in Alzheimer’s.

Marin had a high profile at the conference. The Aging Action Initiative hosted a peer group discussion on successful approaches to advocacy, education, and service coordination within a collaborative network. Shirin Vakharia of the Marin Community Foundation was one of the five co-chairs on the Conference Leadership Committee and moderator for the “Creating and Sustaining CBO Business Partnerships” session at the Managed Care Academy Boot Camp. A.A.I.’s Steering Committee chair Joe O’Hehir was a highlighted speaker at that Boot Camp. The Buck Institute for Research on Aging sponsored a tour of its I.M. Pei-designed Novato campus. And, Erin McAuliffe of Marin Transit and I volunteered for the world cafe discussions at the Second Annual Summit on Livable Communities, which focused on age-friendly planning.

Here’s my top 10 list of things I heard or learned at the ASA conference:

#10 Over 50% of older people are on Facebook! Older people are increasingly using Facebook to connect with each other and with services, and to learn about opportunities to advocate for change.

#9 The program Silver Sneakers allows eligible adults to access thousands of gyms and fitness classes at no cost. Check it out: www.silversneakers.com.

#8 “We’ve added a decade to our lives, but we are likely to need help in that decade, with more and higher health care costs.” Medical facilities are realizing that when people go home with access to community-based supports, there are fewer readmissions, health care costs go down, and employee satisfaction goes up. As more people grow older in Marin in the next two decades, A.A.I. collaborations can play a pivotal role in ensuring that people can age and die at home, rather than in the ICU or an institution.

#7 “Five percent of the older population are ‘complex patients’ accounting for 58 percent of medical costs.” CBOs need to be mindful in health care partnerships about the time and staff needed to provide services to patients with multiple physical and mental illnesses.

#6 Health = 80% social determinants + 20% genes. Many speakers noted how social determinants of health (poverty, race, immigration status, etc.) are coming of age as a common theme nationwide. This leads us to #5 . . .

#5 “Under the new administration, money is going to tech startups and not CBOs. Funding is going to the disruptors who are not as aware or capable as CBOs in partnering for health care.” Arggh! Keynote speakers pointed out that to reduce emergency room visits, readmissions, and the length of hospital stays, health care institutions need to look for “social practitioners.” CBOs already know about the needs of their communities. They know what it means to be poor, hungry, or an immigrant. The greatest potential today to transform medical care is to partner health care institutions with CBOs and the public sector for more responsive and cost-effective health care.

#4 “Health care happens in the home.” No surprise here: most health care is at home, where people are most comfortable. As I checked out the Exhibition Hall, I came across these fun no-maintenance responsive pets: https://joyforall.hasbro.com. There is a wealth of technological innovations making it possible for people to stay at home for as long as possible.

#3 Alzheimer’s researchers are looking for people for clinical trials. We can help spread the word: https://www.nia.nih.gov/alzheimers/clinical-trials

#2 “We are moving from working individually to working collaboratively.” Several speakers celebrated that the recently-adopted budget in Washington included an increase in funding for older Americans, despite an original budget that cut funding. Working together, advocates were able to not just stop cuts to Meals-on-Wheels and others, but to convince elected officials to approve an increase in funding!

#1 We must stop using language that triggers negatives, creates a fear about aging, and repels potential supporters.” The collaborative Reframing Aging project by eight of the leading aging organizations in the U.S. has the goal to reduce ageism through changing public perceptions about growing older. It provides a wealth of resources for you to use in your organization. Check out this online toolkit. At AAI’s 2018 Convening, we introduced ‘reframing,’ and you will hear more from A.A.I. about this transformative approach this year.

I came back to Marin and our lively 2018 Convening on April 3. Over 100 people came this year! We had a lovely day in Tiburon. In this newsletter, we have A.A.I. Steering Committee member Teri Dowling’s inspired reflection on words from Buddha. In case you missed the Convening, here’s your peek into what we talked about: https://www.ted.com/talks/ashton_applewhite_let_s_end_ageism (Ashton Applewhite TED Talk about ageism). I promise that A.A.I. will share more about this transformative approach in upcoming months.

See you around Marin ~

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Register Now for AAI’s 6th Annual Convening!

REGISTER NOW

Join us for the Aging Action Initiative’s 6th Annual Convening on April 3, 2018. We will meet at The Lodge at Tiburon in downtown Tiburon from 9am to 4pm. Representatives from public agencies, nonprofit organizations, and the health sector will gather for a day of education, advocacy, and collaboration as we work together for an age-friendly Marin.

Sessions include:
– AAI 2018: Rallying for Change
– Lens on Aging Equity: Insights for Change
– American Society on Aging Conference: Bringing Home More than a T-shirt
– Advocacy: A Place to Live, Aging in Community, Economic Sustainability, and Transportation
PLUS networking to strengthen our community

Please register by March 28 to reserve your spot!

Lunch included. Coffee and pastries at 8:30am.

Please contact sami@agingactioninitiative.org with any questions.

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Better Nutrition Program for Older Adults

hands of a senior woman preparing vegetables for cooking, part of a series

May 17, 2016 |

“Next Steps to Better Nutrition” Program for Older Adults

The Next Steps to Better Nutrition program was developed by the National Council on Aging and the American Heart Association to teach older adults about better nutrition. The program focuses on the relationship between nutrition and chronic disease.

The program consists of a 6 hour-long modules. The modules cover how older adults can afford, purchase, and cook more nutritious foods. Participants discover how they can take concrete action steps to improve their diet and keep their heart healthy. Each module includes related teaching materials, video presentations, facilitator scripts, and handouts. Most handouts include Spanish versions.

These training modules can be used to deliver nutrition education in senior centers and other community organizations.

The complete set of nutrition education modules is available to download below.

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